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Additional kinematic variables to describe differences in the trot between clinically normal dogs and dogs with hip dysplasia

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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314.
  • | 2 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314.
  • | 3 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314.
  • | 4 present address is Animal Surgical Clinic of Seattle, 4102 Stone Way N, Seattle, WA 98103.
  • | 5 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1314.

Abstract

Objective—To describe the abnormal gait of dogs with hip dysplasia by use of kinematic gait analysis.

Animals—19 large-breed dogs with moderate to severe clinical and radiographic evidence of hip dysplasia and 10 clinically normal dogs (controls).

Procedure—Kinematic and force plate data were collected, and degree of coxofemoral joint abductionadduction, mediolateral foot movement, distance between hind feet, maximum hind foot elevation, mediolateral pelvic movement, and coxofemoral joint angular acceleration were calculated. Essential Fourier coefficients were determined and used to reconstruct mean angular acceleration curves. Fourier coefficients and foot and pelvic movement data were compared between groups.

Results—Dogs with hip dysplasia had a greater degree of coxofemoral joint adduction and range of abduction-adduction and greater lateral pelvic movement, compared with controls. Foot movement variables did not differ significantly between groups. Coxofemoral joint angular acceleration was greater in the middle to end of the stance phase, whereas deceleration was greater in the late stance to early swing phase and middle to end of the swing phase in dogs with hip dysplasia, compared with controls.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Differences in degree of coxofemoral joint abduction-adduction, amount of mediolateral pelvic movement, and coxofemoral joint angular acceleration between clinically normal dogs and dogs with hip dysplasia may indicate a compensation in gait of affected dogs as a result of discomfort or biomechanical effects attributable to hip dysplasia and degenerative joint disease. Information gained from kinematic and kinetic gait analyses may be useful in evaluating treatments for hip dysplasia in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:974–978)

Abstract

Objective—To describe the abnormal gait of dogs with hip dysplasia by use of kinematic gait analysis.

Animals—19 large-breed dogs with moderate to severe clinical and radiographic evidence of hip dysplasia and 10 clinically normal dogs (controls).

Procedure—Kinematic and force plate data were collected, and degree of coxofemoral joint abductionadduction, mediolateral foot movement, distance between hind feet, maximum hind foot elevation, mediolateral pelvic movement, and coxofemoral joint angular acceleration were calculated. Essential Fourier coefficients were determined and used to reconstruct mean angular acceleration curves. Fourier coefficients and foot and pelvic movement data were compared between groups.

Results—Dogs with hip dysplasia had a greater degree of coxofemoral joint adduction and range of abduction-adduction and greater lateral pelvic movement, compared with controls. Foot movement variables did not differ significantly between groups. Coxofemoral joint angular acceleration was greater in the middle to end of the stance phase, whereas deceleration was greater in the late stance to early swing phase and middle to end of the swing phase in dogs with hip dysplasia, compared with controls.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Differences in degree of coxofemoral joint abduction-adduction, amount of mediolateral pelvic movement, and coxofemoral joint angular acceleration between clinically normal dogs and dogs with hip dysplasia may indicate a compensation in gait of affected dogs as a result of discomfort or biomechanical effects attributable to hip dysplasia and degenerative joint disease. Information gained from kinematic and kinetic gait analyses may be useful in evaluating treatments for hip dysplasia in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:974–978)