Use of a nonionic detergent (Triton WR 1339) in healthy cats to assess hepatic secretion of triglyceride

Jean A. Hall Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-4802.

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Joseph L. Gradin Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-4802.

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Claire B. Andreasen Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-4802.
Andreasen's present address is Department of Veterinary Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011- 1250.

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Rosemary C. Wander Department of Nutrition and Food Management, College of Home Economics and Education, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-4802.
present address is Department of Nutrition and Foodservice Systems, School of Human Environmental Sciences, University of North Carolina, Greensboro, NC 27402-6170.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine whether a nonionic detergent (Triton WR 1339) can be used in cats to assess hepatic secretion of triglyceride.

Animals—28 healthy cats.

Procedure—Triton WR 1339 was administered IV according to the following schedule: 5, 50, 150, and 250 mg/kg of body weight. Control cats did not receive an injection or received 0.9% NaCl or PBS solutions at the same osmolarity and volume as the 250 mg/kg group. Blood samples were collected throughout the 48-hour period after administration for determination of triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations and for RBC morphology and osmotic fragility studies.

Results—Administration of Triton WR 1339 at 150 and 250 mg/kg caused profound hypertriglyceridemia. Triglyceride concentrations increased in a curvilinear fashion for the first 2 hours and remained increased for approximately 24 hours. Area under the time-concentration curve for triglyceride at 5 hours differed significantly among groups. At 12 and 24 hours, cholesterol was significantly higher in cats receiving 250 mg/kg. The most dramatic changes in osmotic fragility and RBC morphology were in cats receiving 250 mg/kg; 1 of these cats developed severe icterus and died 5 days later. Feeding rice and casein before administering Triton WR 1339 at 150 mg/kg did not appear to affect the hypertriglyceridemia response.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Triton WR 1339 can be administered IV to cats at a rate of 150 mg/kg to assess hepatic triglyceride secretion, although some cats may have increased RBC osmotic fragility. Higher dosages caused substantial adverse effects, whereas lower dosages did not alter plasma triglyceride concentration. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:941–950)

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether a nonionic detergent (Triton WR 1339) can be used in cats to assess hepatic secretion of triglyceride.

Animals—28 healthy cats.

Procedure—Triton WR 1339 was administered IV according to the following schedule: 5, 50, 150, and 250 mg/kg of body weight. Control cats did not receive an injection or received 0.9% NaCl or PBS solutions at the same osmolarity and volume as the 250 mg/kg group. Blood samples were collected throughout the 48-hour period after administration for determination of triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations and for RBC morphology and osmotic fragility studies.

Results—Administration of Triton WR 1339 at 150 and 250 mg/kg caused profound hypertriglyceridemia. Triglyceride concentrations increased in a curvilinear fashion for the first 2 hours and remained increased for approximately 24 hours. Area under the time-concentration curve for triglyceride at 5 hours differed significantly among groups. At 12 and 24 hours, cholesterol was significantly higher in cats receiving 250 mg/kg. The most dramatic changes in osmotic fragility and RBC morphology were in cats receiving 250 mg/kg; 1 of these cats developed severe icterus and died 5 days later. Feeding rice and casein before administering Triton WR 1339 at 150 mg/kg did not appear to affect the hypertriglyceridemia response.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Triton WR 1339 can be administered IV to cats at a rate of 150 mg/kg to assess hepatic triglyceride secretion, although some cats may have increased RBC osmotic fragility. Higher dosages caused substantial adverse effects, whereas lower dosages did not alter plasma triglyceride concentration. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:941–950)

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