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Pharmacokinetics of erythromycin estolate and erythromycin phosphate after intragastric administration to healthy foals

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  • 1 Departments of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 2 present address is Department of Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 3 Departments of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 4 Departments of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 5 present address is Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 6 Departments of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Abstract

Objective—To determine pharmacokinetics and plasma concentrations of erythromycin and related compounds after intragastric administration of erythromycin phosphate and erythromycin estolate to healthy foals.

Animals—11 healthy 2- to 6-month-old foals.

Procedure—Food was withheld from foals overnight before intragastric administration of erythromycin estolate (25 mg/kg of body weight; n = 8) and erythromycin phosphate (25 mg/kg; 7). Four foals received both drugs with 2 weeks between treatments. Plasma erythromycin concentrations were determined at various times after drug administration by use of high-performance liquid chromatography. Maximum plasma peak concentrations, time to maximum concentrations, area under plasma concentration versus time curves, half-life of elimination, and mean residence times were determined from concentration versus time curves.

Results—Maximum peak concentration of erythromycin A after administration of erythromycin phosphate was significantly greater than after administration of erythromycin estolate (2.9 ± 1.1 µg/ml vs 1.0 ± 0.82 µg/ml). Time to maximum concentration was shorter after administration of erythromycin phosphate than after erythromycin estolate (0.71 ± 0.29 hours vs 1.7 ± 1.2 hours). Concentrations of anhydroerythromycin A were significantly less 1 and 3 hours after administration of erythromycin estolate than after administration of erythromycin phosphate.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Plasma concentrations of erythromycin A remained > 0.25 µg/ml (reported minimum inhibitory concentration for Rhodococcus equi) for at least 4 hours after intragastric administration of erythromycin phosphate or erythromycin estolate, suggesting that the recommended dosage for either formulation (25 mg/kg, q 6 h) should be adequate for treatment of R equi infections in foals. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:914–919)

Abstract

Objective—To determine pharmacokinetics and plasma concentrations of erythromycin and related compounds after intragastric administration of erythromycin phosphate and erythromycin estolate to healthy foals.

Animals—11 healthy 2- to 6-month-old foals.

Procedure—Food was withheld from foals overnight before intragastric administration of erythromycin estolate (25 mg/kg of body weight; n = 8) and erythromycin phosphate (25 mg/kg; 7). Four foals received both drugs with 2 weeks between treatments. Plasma erythromycin concentrations were determined at various times after drug administration by use of high-performance liquid chromatography. Maximum plasma peak concentrations, time to maximum concentrations, area under plasma concentration versus time curves, half-life of elimination, and mean residence times were determined from concentration versus time curves.

Results—Maximum peak concentration of erythromycin A after administration of erythromycin phosphate was significantly greater than after administration of erythromycin estolate (2.9 ± 1.1 µg/ml vs 1.0 ± 0.82 µg/ml). Time to maximum concentration was shorter after administration of erythromycin phosphate than after erythromycin estolate (0.71 ± 0.29 hours vs 1.7 ± 1.2 hours). Concentrations of anhydroerythromycin A were significantly less 1 and 3 hours after administration of erythromycin estolate than after administration of erythromycin phosphate.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Plasma concentrations of erythromycin A remained > 0.25 µg/ml (reported minimum inhibitory concentration for Rhodococcus equi) for at least 4 hours after intragastric administration of erythromycin phosphate or erythromycin estolate, suggesting that the recommended dosage for either formulation (25 mg/kg, q 6 h) should be adequate for treatment of R equi infections in foals. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:914–919)