Blood oxygen binding in double-muscled calves and dairy calves with conventional muscle conformation

Carole Cambier Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Liège, B-4000 Liège, Belgium.

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Thierry Clerbaux Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pneumology, Cliniques Universitaires Saint- Luc, UCL, B-1200 Brussels, Belgium.

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Bruno Detry Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pneumology, Cliniques Universitaires Saint- Luc, UCL, B-1200 Brussels, Belgium.

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Dominique Beerens Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Liège, B-4000 Liège, Belgium.

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Albert Frans Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pneumology, Cliniques Universitaires Saint- Luc, UCL, B-1200 Brussels, Belgium.

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Pascal Gustin Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Liège, B-4000 Liège, Belgium.

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Abstract

Objective—To assess in vivo blood oxygen binding in double-muscled calves and dairy calves with conventional muscle conformation.

Animals—58 dairy and 48 double-muscled calves.

Procedure—Calves were classified as neonatal (24 hours old) or older calves (2 to 26 days old). Venous and arterial blood samples were collected, and hemoglobin concentration, pH, Pco2, and Po2 were determined. Blood oxygen equilibrium curves (OEC) under standard conditions were constructed, and the oxygen exchange fraction (OEF) and the amount of oxygen released at the tissue level by 100 ml of blood (OEF Vol%) were calculated.

Results—In each breed, partial pressure of oxygen at 50% saturation of hemoglobin (P50) under standard conditions was significantly higher in older than in neonatal calves, indicating a right shift in OEC with age. Venous P50 was significantly lower in neonatal double-muscled calves than in neonatal dairy calves, but arterial and venous P50 were significantly higher in older double-muscled calves than in older dairy calves. In double-muscled, but not in dairy, calves, OEF was significantly higher in older than in neonatal calves. In neonatal calves, OEF Vol% was not significantly different between breeds, but OEF Vol% was significantly higher in older double-muscled calves than in older dairy calves.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The lower OEF in neonatal double-muscled calves, compared with dairy calves, could contribute to the higher sensitivity of double-muscled calves to hypoxia. Blood oxygen affinity decreased with age, but OEF and OEF Vol% were unchanged with age in dairy calves, whereas they increased with age in double-muscled calves. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:299–304)

Abstract

Objective—To assess in vivo blood oxygen binding in double-muscled calves and dairy calves with conventional muscle conformation.

Animals—58 dairy and 48 double-muscled calves.

Procedure—Calves were classified as neonatal (24 hours old) or older calves (2 to 26 days old). Venous and arterial blood samples were collected, and hemoglobin concentration, pH, Pco2, and Po2 were determined. Blood oxygen equilibrium curves (OEC) under standard conditions were constructed, and the oxygen exchange fraction (OEF) and the amount of oxygen released at the tissue level by 100 ml of blood (OEF Vol%) were calculated.

Results—In each breed, partial pressure of oxygen at 50% saturation of hemoglobin (P50) under standard conditions was significantly higher in older than in neonatal calves, indicating a right shift in OEC with age. Venous P50 was significantly lower in neonatal double-muscled calves than in neonatal dairy calves, but arterial and venous P50 were significantly higher in older double-muscled calves than in older dairy calves. In double-muscled, but not in dairy, calves, OEF was significantly higher in older than in neonatal calves. In neonatal calves, OEF Vol% was not significantly different between breeds, but OEF Vol% was significantly higher in older double-muscled calves than in older dairy calves.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The lower OEF in neonatal double-muscled calves, compared with dairy calves, could contribute to the higher sensitivity of double-muscled calves to hypoxia. Blood oxygen affinity decreased with age, but OEF and OEF Vol% were unchanged with age in dairy calves, whereas they increased with age in double-muscled calves. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:299–304)

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