Effects of intravenous infusion of guaifenesin on electroencephalographic variables in pigs

Henning A. Haga Department of Large Animal Clinical Science, The Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo, Norway.

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Henning Moerch Department of Large Animal Clinical Science, The Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo, Norway.

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Nils E. Soli Departments of Pharmacology, Microbiology and Food Hygiene, The Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo, Norway.

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Abstract

Objective—To investigate the sedative effects of guaifenesin in pigs by use of electroencephalography.

Animals—10 Norwegian Landrace pigs (5 castrated males and 5 sexually intact females).

Procedure—Guaifenesin (150 mg/kg of body weight, IV) was administered during a 5-minute period. Using a 2-channel referential electrode configuration, electroencephalograms were recorded before, during, and after infusion of guaifenesin. Changes in spectral edge frequency 95% (SEF), median frequency (MED), and total power were evaluated.

Results—After administration of guaifenesin, SEF decreased significantly, and total power increased significantly; however, MED did not change significantly. Analysis of the data did not reveal differences between pigs on the basis of sex.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—We concluded that guaifenesin synchronized the patterns of electroencephalograms. This is a strong indication that the drug has a sedative effect in pigs. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:1599–1601)

Abstract

Objective—To investigate the sedative effects of guaifenesin in pigs by use of electroencephalography.

Animals—10 Norwegian Landrace pigs (5 castrated males and 5 sexually intact females).

Procedure—Guaifenesin (150 mg/kg of body weight, IV) was administered during a 5-minute period. Using a 2-channel referential electrode configuration, electroencephalograms were recorded before, during, and after infusion of guaifenesin. Changes in spectral edge frequency 95% (SEF), median frequency (MED), and total power were evaluated.

Results—After administration of guaifenesin, SEF decreased significantly, and total power increased significantly; however, MED did not change significantly. Analysis of the data did not reveal differences between pigs on the basis of sex.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—We concluded that guaifenesin synchronized the patterns of electroencephalograms. This is a strong indication that the drug has a sedative effect in pigs. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:1599–1601)

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