Effect of administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs before surgery on renal function in clinically normal dogs

Remo G. Lobetti Department of Companion Animal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X04, Onderstepoort, 0110, South Africa.

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Kenneth E. Joubert Section of Anesthesiology, Department of Companion Animal Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X04, Onderstepoort, 0110, South Africa.

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Abstract

Objectives—To investigate renal function in clinically normal dogs undergoing general anesthesia for ovariohysterectomies that received nonsteriodal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID) before surgery.

Animals—40 clinically normal dogs.

Procedure—After induction of anesthesia, dogs were given an analgesic. Renal function was assessed before surgery and 24 and 48 hours after surgery by means of serum urea and creatinine concentrations, fractional clearance of sodium (FCNa), urine y-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities, and urine analysis. Ten dogs in each of 4 groups received ketorolac tromethamine (0.5 mg/kg of body weight), ketoprofen (1 mg/kg), carprofen (4 mg/kg), or morphine (0.1 mg/kg; control group).

Results—Duration of general anesthesia ranged from 1.75 to 5 hours, with a mean of 3 hours. Two ketorolac- and 2 ketoprofen-treated dogs had transient azotemia. A significant decrease in the FCNa between before surgery and 24 hours after surgery, and between before surgery and 48 hours after surgery, was found in ketoprofen- and carprofen-treated dogs. Ketorolac-, ketoprofen-, and morphine-treated dogs had a decrease in urine specific gravity. Two ketorolac- , 1 ketoprofen-, 1 carprofen-, and 4 morphine-treated dogs had increases in renal tubular epithelial cells on urine sediment examination 24 hours after surgery.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In clinically normal dogs undergoing general anesthesia and elective surgery, the use of NSAID as analgesics is not contraindicated. Compared with ketorolac or ketoprofen, carprofen had the least effect on renal function and integrity. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:1501–1506)

Abstract

Objectives—To investigate renal function in clinically normal dogs undergoing general anesthesia for ovariohysterectomies that received nonsteriodal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAID) before surgery.

Animals—40 clinically normal dogs.

Procedure—After induction of anesthesia, dogs were given an analgesic. Renal function was assessed before surgery and 24 and 48 hours after surgery by means of serum urea and creatinine concentrations, fractional clearance of sodium (FCNa), urine y-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities, and urine analysis. Ten dogs in each of 4 groups received ketorolac tromethamine (0.5 mg/kg of body weight), ketoprofen (1 mg/kg), carprofen (4 mg/kg), or morphine (0.1 mg/kg; control group).

Results—Duration of general anesthesia ranged from 1.75 to 5 hours, with a mean of 3 hours. Two ketorolac- and 2 ketoprofen-treated dogs had transient azotemia. A significant decrease in the FCNa between before surgery and 24 hours after surgery, and between before surgery and 48 hours after surgery, was found in ketoprofen- and carprofen-treated dogs. Ketorolac-, ketoprofen-, and morphine-treated dogs had a decrease in urine specific gravity. Two ketorolac- , 1 ketoprofen-, 1 carprofen-, and 4 morphine-treated dogs had increases in renal tubular epithelial cells on urine sediment examination 24 hours after surgery.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In clinically normal dogs undergoing general anesthesia and elective surgery, the use of NSAID as analgesics is not contraindicated. Compared with ketorolac or ketoprofen, carprofen had the least effect on renal function and integrity. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:1501–1506)

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