Effects of tilmicosin phosphate, administered prior to transport or at time of arrival, and feeding of chlortetracycline, after arrival in a feedlot, on Mannheimia haemolytica in nasal secretions of transported steers

Glynn H. Frank Respiratory Diseases of Livestock Research Unit, USDA, Agricultural Research Service, National Animal Disease Center, PO Box 70, Ames, IA 50010.

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 DVM, PhD
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Glenn C. Duff Clayton Livestock Research Center, Department of Animal and Range Sciences, New Mexico State University, Clayton, NM 88415.

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 PhD

Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of time of administration of tilmicosin and feeding of chlortetracycline on colonization of the nasopharynx of transported cattle by Mannheimia haemolytica (MH).

Animals—454 steers (body weight, 200 kg).

Procedure—3 studies included 4 truckloads of steers assembled and processed in the southeastern United States. For each truckload of steers, a third received tilmicosin before transportation (PRIOR), then all were transported to a feedlot in New Mexico (23 hours). At arrival (day 0), another third received tilmicosin (ARR). The remaining third did not receive tilmicosin (control steers [CTR]). Steers in studies 1 and 2 were housed in a feedlot, and steers in study 3 were housed on wheat pasture. One half of the steers from each group in studies 2 and 3 were fed chlortetracycline on days 5 to 9. Steer with signs of respiratory tract disease were treated. Nasal swab specimens were examined for MH to determine colonization.

Results—PRIOR and ARR steers had a lower incidence of respiratory tract disease and MH colonization than CTR steers, but PRIOR and ARR steers did not differ. Feeding chlortetracycline did not have an effect.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Tilmicosin can inhibit MH from colonizing the nasopharynx of cattle. Because tilmicosin inhibits the growth of MH in the respiratory tract, medication with tilmicosin prior to transport should reduce the incidence of acute respiratory tract disease during the first week at the feedlot when calves are most susceptible to infectious organisms. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61: 1479–1483)

Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of time of administration of tilmicosin and feeding of chlortetracycline on colonization of the nasopharynx of transported cattle by Mannheimia haemolytica (MH).

Animals—454 steers (body weight, 200 kg).

Procedure—3 studies included 4 truckloads of steers assembled and processed in the southeastern United States. For each truckload of steers, a third received tilmicosin before transportation (PRIOR), then all were transported to a feedlot in New Mexico (23 hours). At arrival (day 0), another third received tilmicosin (ARR). The remaining third did not receive tilmicosin (control steers [CTR]). Steers in studies 1 and 2 were housed in a feedlot, and steers in study 3 were housed on wheat pasture. One half of the steers from each group in studies 2 and 3 were fed chlortetracycline on days 5 to 9. Steer with signs of respiratory tract disease were treated. Nasal swab specimens were examined for MH to determine colonization.

Results—PRIOR and ARR steers had a lower incidence of respiratory tract disease and MH colonization than CTR steers, but PRIOR and ARR steers did not differ. Feeding chlortetracycline did not have an effect.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Tilmicosin can inhibit MH from colonizing the nasopharynx of cattle. Because tilmicosin inhibits the growth of MH in the respiratory tract, medication with tilmicosin prior to transport should reduce the incidence of acute respiratory tract disease during the first week at the feedlot when calves are most susceptible to infectious organisms. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61: 1479–1483)

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