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Detection of lysozyme in llama, sheep, and cattle tears

Juliet R. GionfriddoDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906.
Current address is Department of Clinical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

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 DVM, MS
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Harriet DavidsonDepartment of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

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 DVM, MS
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Elikplimi K. Asem

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 DVM, PhD
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Sheryl G. KrohneDepartment of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906.

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 DVM, MS

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether the tears of llamas, sheep, and cattle contain lysozyme and compare lysozyme concentrations in tears among these species.

Animals—40 llamas, 5 sheep, and 36 cattle.

Procedure—Electrophoresis, western blot immunoassay for lysozyme, a spectrophotometric assay to detect tear lysozyme by its ability to lyse a suspension of Micrococcus lysodeiticus, and a microtiter plate colorometric assay were performed.

Results—A 13.6-kd protein band was detected by use of electrophoresis and western blot immunoassay in llama and sheep tears but not cattle tears. Results of spectrophotometric assay suggested that llama and sheep tears had high concentrations of lysozyme, whereas cattle tears had low concentrations. Results of the microtiter plate colorometric assay suggested that llama tears had high concentrations of lysozyme, whereas concentrations in sheep and cattle tears were lower.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Lysozyme concentrations in tears may vary among species and this variability may contribute to differing susceptibilities to ocular diseases such as infectious keratoconjunctivitis. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:1294–1297)

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether the tears of llamas, sheep, and cattle contain lysozyme and compare lysozyme concentrations in tears among these species.

Animals—40 llamas, 5 sheep, and 36 cattle.

Procedure—Electrophoresis, western blot immunoassay for lysozyme, a spectrophotometric assay to detect tear lysozyme by its ability to lyse a suspension of Micrococcus lysodeiticus, and a microtiter plate colorometric assay were performed.

Results—A 13.6-kd protein band was detected by use of electrophoresis and western blot immunoassay in llama and sheep tears but not cattle tears. Results of spectrophotometric assay suggested that llama and sheep tears had high concentrations of lysozyme, whereas cattle tears had low concentrations. Results of the microtiter plate colorometric assay suggested that llama tears had high concentrations of lysozyme, whereas concentrations in sheep and cattle tears were lower.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Lysozyme concentrations in tears may vary among species and this variability may contribute to differing susceptibilities to ocular diseases such as infectious keratoconjunctivitis. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:1294–1297)