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Effects of 0.005% latanoprost solution on intraocular pressure in healthy dogs and cats

Michele E. StuderDepartment of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

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Charles L. MartinDepartment of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

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Jean StilesDepartment of Small Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
Present address is Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate effects of daily topical ocular administration of latanoprost solution on intraocular pressure (IOP) in healthy cats and dogs.

Animals—9 domestic shorthair cats and 14 dogs.

Procedure—Latanoprost solution (0.005%) was administered topically to 1 eye (treated) and vehicle to the other eye (control) of all animals once daily in the morning for 8 days. Intraocular pressure was measured twice daily for the 5 days preceding treatment, and IOP, pupillary diameter, conjunctival hyperemia, and blepharospasm were measured 0, 1, 6, and 12 hours after the first 4 treatments and 0 and 12 hours after the final 4 treatments. Measurements continued twice a day for 5 days after treatment was discontinued. Aqueous flare was measured once daily during and for 5 days after the treatment period.

Results—Intraocular pressure and pupillary diameter were significantly decreased in the treated eye of dogs, compared with the control eye. Mild conjunctival hyperemia was also detected, but severity did not differ significantly between eyes. Blepharospasm and aqueous flare were not detected in either eye. Intraocular pressure in cats was not significantly affected by treatment with latanoprost. However, pupillary diameter was significantly decreased in the treated eye, compared with the control eye. Conjunctival hyperemia, aqueous flare, and blepharospasm were not detected in either eye.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Once-daily topical ocular administration of latanoprost solution (0.005%) reduced IOP in healthy dogs without inducing adverse effects but did not affect IOP in healthy cats. Latanoprost may be useful for treating glaucoma in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:1220–1224)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate effects of daily topical ocular administration of latanoprost solution on intraocular pressure (IOP) in healthy cats and dogs.

Animals—9 domestic shorthair cats and 14 dogs.

Procedure—Latanoprost solution (0.005%) was administered topically to 1 eye (treated) and vehicle to the other eye (control) of all animals once daily in the morning for 8 days. Intraocular pressure was measured twice daily for the 5 days preceding treatment, and IOP, pupillary diameter, conjunctival hyperemia, and blepharospasm were measured 0, 1, 6, and 12 hours after the first 4 treatments and 0 and 12 hours after the final 4 treatments. Measurements continued twice a day for 5 days after treatment was discontinued. Aqueous flare was measured once daily during and for 5 days after the treatment period.

Results—Intraocular pressure and pupillary diameter were significantly decreased in the treated eye of dogs, compared with the control eye. Mild conjunctival hyperemia was also detected, but severity did not differ significantly between eyes. Blepharospasm and aqueous flare were not detected in either eye. Intraocular pressure in cats was not significantly affected by treatment with latanoprost. However, pupillary diameter was significantly decreased in the treated eye, compared with the control eye. Conjunctival hyperemia, aqueous flare, and blepharospasm were not detected in either eye.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Once-daily topical ocular administration of latanoprost solution (0.005%) reduced IOP in healthy dogs without inducing adverse effects but did not affect IOP in healthy cats. Latanoprost may be useful for treating glaucoma in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:1220–1224)